itzhak perlman - ReYep
His awards :

Grammy - Best Instrumental Solo Performance with Orchestra (1977-1980-1981-1982-1987-1990-1995)
Grammy - Best Chamber Music Performance (1978-1981-1987-1990)
Grammy - Best Classical Music Album for Brahms Violin Concerto (1978)
Grammy - Best Instrumental Solo Performance without Orchestra (1980)
Medal of Liberty (1986)
Emmy - Outstanding Individual Achievement in Classical Music (1992)
Emmy - Outstanding Individual Achievement (1994)
Emmy - Outstanding Cultural Music and Dance Program for "Itzhak Perlman In The Fiddler's House" (1996)
Emmy - Outstanding Cultural Music and Dance Program for "Itzhak Perlman Fiddling for the Future" (1999)
National Medal of Arts (2000)
Kennedy Center Honors (2003)
Juilliard - Honorary Doctorate and Centennial Medal (2005)
Grammy - Lifetime Achievement Award (2008)
I came across a quote somewhere that says, "I have a simple philosophy. It's necessary to separate abilities from disabilities. My inability to walk, my need for crutches, a wheelchair, or anything else has nothing to do with my ability to play the violin."
In 1975, Perlman began teaching at the Brooklyn College Conservatory of Music in New York and also served as a faculty member at the Juilliard School, where he had previously received his education.

Itzhak Perlman's extraordinary talent, poise, generous nature, and warm interaction with the audience have made him one of the world's most popular musicians. He has frequently appeared on American television both as a performer and commentator.

While Perlman has a special passion for the Romantic Period in music, his vast repertoire extends from Baroque to Contemporary compositions. In addition to classical music, he has collaborated with his friend André Previn and Oscar Peterson in other music genres such as jazz and ragtime.

Despite having to perform in a wheelchair due to his medical condition, Perlman continues to inspire all musicians with his remarkable talent and deep love for music.
After giving his first solo concerts in Tel Aviv, Perlman's American adventure began in 1958 when he was invited to appear on the program by the renowned showman Ed Sullivan. Perlman garnered significant attention and admiration for his talent on the show, leading him to settle in New York with his mother the same year and enroll at the Juilliard School of Music. During his time at Juilliard, Perlman had the opportunity to study for several years under the guidance of the world-famous violinist and violin teacher Ivan Galamian and his assistant Dorothy DeLay. In 1964, Perlman took the stage at Carnegie Hall and achieved first place in the prestigious international competition Leventritt.

Following the competition, Itzhak Perlman received concert and recording offers and performed with some of the world's largest symphony orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic. In his first recording, he performed Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto. Regarded as one of the brightest violinists of his generation, Itzhak Perlman engaged in chamber music collaborations with renowned artists such as pianist Daniel Barenboim, violinist Pinchas Zukerman, and cellists Jacqueline Du Pré and Lynn Harrell. He also recorded duo albums with pianist Vladimir Ashkenazy.
At the age of four, Perlman, who contracted polio, managed to learn to walk with the help of crutches and leg braces in a short period by practicing for a year to recover. After leaving the hospital, she enrolled in the Tel Aviv Music Academy with an American-Israeli Cultural Foundation scholarship and began violin studies with Rivka Goldgart. By the age of seven, she had performed with the Ramat-Gan Orchestra in Tel Aviv and the Radio Orchestra in Jerusalem, showcasing her talent. At just ten years old in 1955, the young violinist gave her first solo recital, being recognized as a musical prodigy in Israel, despite the challenges posed by her inherited condition.
Itzhak Perlman is a really amazing violinist, conductor, and teacher from Israel. He was born on August 31, 1945, in Tel Aviv. Let me tell you some cool things about him:

When Perlman was just a little kid, he started playing the violin. Can you believe he was only three years old? That's really impressive! But unfortunately, when he was four, he got really sick with polio, which made him unable to walk. But guess what? He didn't let that stop him! He kept on playing the violin and worked really hard to become a fantastic musician.

Perlman has played with some of the most famous orchestras in the world, like the New York Philharmonic, the Berlin Philharmonic, and the London Symphony Orchestra. He's won a bunch of Grammy Awards for his recordings too—16 in total! Wow, that's a lot!

Oh, and you know that movie "Schindler's List"? He played the beautiful violin solos in the music for that film. It won an Academy Award! Isn't that awesome?

Not only is Perlman an incredible musician, but he also loves teaching. He's taught at really fancy music schools like Juilliard and has even started his own music program. He's really passionate about making sure everyone can enjoy music, no matter their abilities.

He's been honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, which is like the biggest award you can get in the United States. It was given to him for all his amazing music and for being a champion for people with disabilities.

You know, Perlman doesn't just play the violin—he's also conducted orchestras all over the world. Talk about talent!

Itzhak Perlman is such an inspiration. His love for music, his incredible skills, and his positive attitude make him a true superstar. People of all ages look up to him and his amazing journey in the world of classical music.